The Dinglehopper

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Click Clack Review

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This Throwback Thursday we take a look at a Caldecott Classic, Click Clack Moo.

Farmer Brown has a problem.

His cows like to type.

All day long he hears

Click, clack, MOO.

Click, clack, MOO.

Clickety, clack, MOO.

But Farmer Brown’s problems REALLY begin when his cows start leaving him notes….

Doreen Cronin’s understated text and Betsy Lewin’s expressive illustrations make the most of this hilarious situation. Come join the fun as a bunch of literate cows turn Farmer Brown’s farm upside down.

Our toddler loved this one.  Last weekend everyone from Grandma to toddler was sick and I was tasked with maintaining the status quo to whatever extent I could.  We’d picked up a selection of well regarded kids’ books with a Kindle Christmas gift card, but I hadn’t had many opportunities to sit down and read them.  The allure of tablets is mostly games and video, but since I generally read, I think our toddler indulged me.

There’s the same attractive ability to choose from scrolling icons and this was the first one to come up.

Click Clack Moo: Cows that Type is a simply but elegantly drawn book with heavy lines and soft colors that stray from their confines.  The pages aren’t busy.  The rhythm of the words and the clever story propel the readers forward.  So it’s suitable for the very young.

Cow! Duck!  Try typewriter and ‘lectric blanket, too.

The story isn’t exactly Marxist, but it does imply that a literate population in control of the means of communication can effect a change in their conditions.  The cows strike for electric blankets and are joined by the chickens.  The dumbfounded farmer eventually capitulates but demands remission of the typewriter.  The cows trade this invaluable tool for marginally more comfort.

The book ends on a clever note as the ducks entrusted with returning the typewriter instead use it to make demands of their own.  Dependeing on your perspective, this demonstrates the power of a literate educated population and the danger of those in control giving in to collective demands.

Recommended for fans of Kautsky, Cows, and Comfort.

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