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Graphic Novel Review – Miracleman Book One: A Dream of Flying

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Miracleman Book One: A Dream of Flying by Alan Moore
illustrated by Gary Leach and Alan Davis

Miracleman A Dream of Flying

KIMOTA! With one magic word, a long-forgotten legend lives again! Freelance reporter Michael Moran always knew he was meant for something more-now, an unexpected series of events leads him to reclaim his destiny as Miracleman! The groundbreaking graphic novel that heralded a literary revolution begins here in A DREAM OF FLYING. After nearly two decades away, Miracleman uncovers his origins and their connection to the British military’s “Project Zarathustra” – while his alter ego, Michael Moran, must reconcile his life as the lesser half of a god.

I read two issues and one trade of Miracleman when my roommate worked for one of the guys that used to set prices in the Overstreet Comic Book Price Guide. All of them were later issues. The trade was by Neil Gaiman. Apocrypha was weird and enticing and ultimately had to be returned.

Like a lot of folks, I wanted trades, collections, whatever. And like a lot folks I waited, and waited, and waited. When the legal issues with regard to the series were finally resolved, I was excited to finally see this masterpiece in the pulp. That’s the waiting talking.

This arc must be ground zero for grimdark. Frank Miller would spend a career trying to be darker and edgier than this. Watchmen, the gold standard for this perspective, is sort of thoughtful and melancholy by comparison.

There’s nothing here but anger and degradation. Planetary issue 7 spends a page parodying just how ridiculous it is and, well, I mean it adds sex midgets, but it’s otherwise pretty much accurate.

Planetary i7p18

It doesn’t so much deconstruct Superman as create an AU where nothing good is possible and every paranoid fantasy is true. Hate something, add it. Fear something, add it. It was inspired by a mashup of the old comic and Mad Magazine, so there you go. What if what might make Superman problematic was written for Mad fans?

Now I get it.

It’s not that it’s not well constructed. Moore was a craftsman even then. It’s just that the idea was toxic. There’s a lot to say about governments, weapons and war, the responsibility and danger of power, and the fragility of identity.

But it’s all been hashed over again and again for decades. Supreme Power comes to mind. And I think that’s because Miracleman wasn’t part of the conversation for twenty years. As a result, we got the heroes as bad guys torn apart when their lives were turned inside out. If you’re curious about where that came from and why, it was A Dream of Flying.

But it’s terrible. Don’t read it.

Recommended for fans of Dark Knight III: The Master Race, The Punisher, and Daniel Tosh.

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