The Dinglehopper

You've Probably Never Heard of Us

‘Mirror’ #1 Makes Magic of Misery

Leave a comment

Mirror_01-1Mirror #1

Story By: Emma Ríos
Art By: Hwei Lim
Published on February 3, 2016 by Image Comics

Lewis Carroll was famous for making up words, most notably in the poem “Jabberwocky.” One of those words is mimsy, which Humpty Dumpty explains to Alice in Through the Looking Glass is a portmanteau for miserable and flimsy. But I’ve always thought it was a mash-up of miserable and whimsy, and this error refuses to right itself in my brain. It is this meaning I kept mentally attributing to Mirror, which shares its use of looking glasses, transformations, plays for power, and talking animals with Carroll’s famous sequel.

The story centers around a boy, Ivan, who is the ward of a magician named Kazbek and is to be trained in magic himself. His dog Cena is the subject of magical experiments by Kazbek that over time give her human qualities including the ability to speak and, eventually, love. That love is seen as an abomination, and the two attempt to run away together, only to be apprehended and separated as Cena escapes into the wilderness. That early part of the story is mirrored with the state of things about 30 years later, when Ivan is a talented magician still under the watchful eye of Kazbek. Kazbek has now succeeded in creating a minotaur, a sphinx, and a talking lab rat, and has been attempting to reproduce the creations ever since. Ivan finds his work immoral and strikes out against him. Mirror #1 sets the stage for an emotional journey where Ivan, Cena, and Zun fight for dignity and freedom.

To read the rest of my review, click through to PopOptiq.com.

 

Advertisements

Author: Erin Perry

I'm a high school English teacher specializing in AP Literature and Film Analysis. I'm interested in most things geeky, including superheroes, vampires, zombies, teen culture, postmodern philosophy, pop culture analysis, and combinations of the aforementioned. Follow me on Twitter @eriuperry.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s