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Every Body Serves the Fathers in ‘Bitch Planet’ #7

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BitchPlanet_07-1Bitch Planet #7
Written by Kelly Sue DeConnick
Art by Valentine De Landro
Colors by Kelly Fitzpatrick
Letters by Clayton Cowles
Published February 17, 2016 by Image Comics

 

DeConnick and De Landro blow the doors off the second arc with stark ironies, nauseating apathies, and contrasting raw emotions. Stakes get higher and allegiances get muddied as the lesson once again rears its ugly head: all bodies serve the Father–male and female, guard and prisoner, black and white. And bodies are disposable.

For all of the language of the Protectorate as a father, Father Josephson is cold to the plight of fathers in the issue. The opening page depicts institutionalized murder of three black children taking a shortcut across Megaton Corporation’s lawn and thus setting off a trespassing alarm. The guard on duty casually orders their “neutralization” in a barely exaggerated fictionalization of the Tamir Rice and Michael Brown killings. Megaton Corp, despite its “personhood” under the law, has no concern for these children or their families. Their fathers will not get answers nor justice. And Father Josephson, the government-labelled father of the people, has no nurture in his nature. Entirely unaware of the cause of the incoming ambulances outside his window, he stresses to Solanza that he needs Maki to finish the arena in six weeks. Maki’s feelings regarding his daughter’s death are an inconvenience to be dealt with after that. Even Roberto Solanza, manager of Bitch Planet itself, has qualms about keeping the news from Makoto. But Father Josephson throws around the name of the Dollar Almighty and silences Solanza.

Read the rest of my review at PopOptiq.com.

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Author: Erin Perry

I'm a high school English teacher specializing in AP Literature and Film Analysis. I'm interested in most things geeky, including superheroes, vampires, zombies, teen culture, postmodern philosophy, pop culture analysis, and combinations of the aforementioned. Follow me on Twitter @eriuperry.

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